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The IUP Journal of Information Technology
Artificial Intelligence: Is Watson the Real Thing?†
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Some researchers have expressed a desire to create a new form of life by means of Artificial Intelligence (AI), a type of computing that will transform machines into human-like intellectual entities. However, intelligence is a rare, complex and imperfectly understood phenomenon. No definition has yet emerged that fully captures the complexity of intelligence in humans. Consequently, the chances of capably synthesizing an artificial form of intelligent entity seem less likely when a complete understanding of this most essential human trait is lacking. Yet, AI researchers have made impressive progress in the endeavor to create more sophisticated machines. Since human intelligence is not a product of computational speed, artificial intelligence will not emerge as a product of computing speed alone. It will be possible to create artificial intelligence only when researchers finally figure out what is the true source of natural intelligence.

 
 

To a certain extent, dramatic improvements in computing capacity have been commonplace throughout the information age. In 1965, Gordon Moore predicted that integrated circuit capacity would continue to double every two years until well into the foreseeable future (Brock, 2006). In the years since his observation, Moore’s Law has predicted computer chip progress with astounding consistency. Year after year, processors have become smaller and faster, while information technologies have become increasingly pervasive and portable. Yet, sophisticated as handheld wireless technologies have become, they are primitive in comparison to the technologies needed to create Artificial Intelligence (AI). AI represents a threshold in computing that will transform machines into human-like intellectual entities. Indeed, rather than merely imitating human intelligence, some AI researchers have expressed a desire to create “a new form of life” (See the homepage of AI Research, http://www.a-i.com/, for just such a declaration). In a world that is used to rapid technological progress, it hardly stretches the imagination to contemplate next-generation computers that are substantially smaller and more powerful than their predecessors.

 
 

Information Technology Journal,Artificial intelligence, Computational speed, IQ, Watson, Eliza