IUP Publications Online
Home About IUP Magazines Journals Books Archives
     
A Guided Tour | Recommend | Links | Subscriber Services | Feedback | Subscribe Online
 
The IUP Journal of Mechanical Engineering
Application of PLC in Medium-Scale Automatic Jaggery Production
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jaggery (pug) is a traditional uncentrifuged sugar. It is a concentrated product of date, cane juice or palm sap without separation of the molasses and crystals and can vary from golden brown to dark brown in color. Jaggery is one of the main agricultural products which is widely used in individual households, eateries, restaurants, hotels, clubs and industrial applications (Rohloff, 1943). 24.5% of the sugarcane produced in India is utilized for producing jaggery (Rao et al., 2007). But more than 70% of the world’s production of jaggery is done in India (Rao et al., 2007). Jaggery is nutritionally and easily available to rural people. Both jaggery and sugar are made from sugarcane, but sugar is produced on a large-scale, whereas jaggery is produced in a very small quantity, nearly 20-25% of sugar; that is because mainly sugar has a long shelf life (Magade et al., 2017). The process of producing jaggery is carried out in five stages, i.e., crushing of sugarcane, storage of sugarcane juice, heating of the juice, cooling and filling in molds (Sinde et al., 2016).

 
 

The main monitoring and controlling of the temperature and motors are done by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), or programmable controller, which is an industrial digital computer that has been ruggedised and adapted for the control of the manufacturing process; programmable controller is a digital computer or industrial computer used for automation of electromechanical processes (Sorte et al., 2015) such as assembly lines or robotic devices or motors or any activity that requires high reliability control and ease of programming and process fault diagnosis. The main difference from other computers is that PLCs are armored for severe conditions (such as dust, moisture, heat and cold) and have the facility for extensive Input/Output (I/O) arrangements (Ali, 2013; and Cammarata, 2015). These connect the PLC to sensors and actuators. PLCs read limit switches, analog process variables (such as temperature and pressure), and the positions of complex positioning systems. On the actuator side, PLCs operate electric motors, pneumatic or hydraulic cylinders, genetic relays, solenoids, or analog outputs. The I/O arrangements may be built into a simple PLC or the PLC may have external I/O modules attached to a computer network that plugs into the PLC.

 
 

Mechanical Engineering Journal, Application of PLC , Automatic Jaggery Production,Individual households.