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The IUP Journal of International Relations :
Armed Resistance in Gaza Strip Against Israeli Occupation: Legitimate Requirement to Achieve Self-Determination
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This paper argues that according to comparative and analytical research, the rules of armed resistance under the International Humanitarian Law require different understanding in the context of Palestine and its struggle against the Israeli occupation. It explains the nature of the Palestinians' right to self-determination and assesses the legitimacy of armed resistance activities against the occupation.

 
 
 

In 1948, when the Israeli Occupying Authorities (IOA) started functioning openly in Palestine, the Palestinians formed independent resistance movements as a direct reaction. These movements varied in their structure and ideologies. For example, some of them were connected with political parties, while others were just popular groups. However, the consideration of the armed resistance as the only option for liberation was a consensus view amongst these movements. The forms of resistance varied according to the capabilities of the Palestinians. Basically, resisting through firearms and bombs against the Israelis was widespread.1

The resistance continued, and in 1967, the IOA extended their occupation to what is currently known as the Gaza Strip (GS) and the West Bank (WB). Accordingly, new resistance movements emerged to fight against the Israelis in those Palestinian territories. Hamas in particular, which is considered as the biggest resistance movement in Palestine, and the factual government of GS, started its operations against the IOA in 1988. Hamas caused significant damage to the Israeli settlers in the GS, which led the IOA to announce their Disengagement Plan from GS in 2005.2

Even though the IOA military forces withdrew from the GS, they still exercise effective control over the borders, the sea, and the air of GS. As a result, Hamas, supported by other Palestinian resistance movements in the GS, like Islamic Jihad and Al-Aqsa Brigades, continued their attacks against the IOA settlements in the Palestinian occupied land, using their internationally recognized right to self-determination and self-defense.3

 
 
 

International Relations Journal,Comparative and analytical research, Israeli Occupying Authorities (IOA), International Humanitarian Law require,Gaza Strip (GS) and the West Bank (WB).