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The IUP Journal of International Relations :
US-Pakistan Relations Since 2009: ‘Do More’ Versus ‘No More’ Deadlock in Afghanistan
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The relationship between the US and Pakistan is facing a serious crisis as the trust deficit between them has increased. Ties between the two are overwhelmingly dependent on Pakistanís ability to cooperate in ending the jihadist terrorism and helping the US stabilize the war-torn Afghanistan. The US continues to accuse Pakistan of not doing enough to counter various terrorist groups operating from its soil, while raising fundamental questions over Islamabadís commitment to countering Islamist extremism. On the other hand, Pakistan accuses the US of disregarding its huge sacrifices in the fight against terrorism, while maintaining that it has done more than enough. The paper tries to examine the nature and dimension of US-Pakistan relations since 2009 against the backdrop of the ongoing war against the Taliban insurgency in Afghanistan.

 
 
 

The US-Pakistan relationship has been a unique, complex and abnormal one. What has been a significant factor in the US-Pakistan relations is that American policy towards Pakistan has fluctuated in response to several global and regional geopolitical changes. The US has followed both engagement and containment policies, termed as carrots and sticks respectively, towards Pakistan.

Pakistanís foreign policy has been historically shaped by the structural determinants of being a major US ally, a fact that has often raised its strategic profile. Its unique geographic location, huge population, nuclear arsenal and worldís sixth-largest army, and standing in the Muslim world have given Pakistan a substantial diplomatic and strategic heft. With its capacity further enhanced by the US patronage, the Pakistan army has become a dominant player in the nationís political life. The US has hired Pakistanís leadership from time to time for the advancement of its strategic interests, and in exchange for its crucial support, Pakistanís ruling elite has hired Washington for military aid and economic assistance to bankroll undemocratic and unaccountable governance.

From the very beginning, the US-Pakistan relationship was built upon shaky and dubious foundation. Pakistani diplomats successfully deceived American policymakers into forging an anti-communist alliance. However, as former Pakistani ambassador to the US, Husain Haqqani, has demonstrated, the primary Pakistani motivation for drawing the US into South Asia was to balance Indiaís military power.1 Pakistan joined the West-sponsored military alliances like the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO) and Central Treaty Organization (CENTO), becoming the Ďmost allied ally of the USí.


 
 
 

International Relations Journal,Relationship between the US and Pakistan, Southeast Asia Treaty Organization (SEATO),Central Treaty Organization (CENTO).