IUP Publications Online
Home About IUP Magazines Journals Books Archives
     
Recommend    |    Subscriber Services    |    Feedback    |     Subscribe Online
 
The IUP Journal of Organizational Behavior :
Shadow Learning in Business Schools: Assessing the Scope to Predict Students Opting for Private Tuitions
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The current study attempts to identify which category of students from the business schools tend to choose shadow education (private tutoring) by examining the influence of important demographic variables that affect the students' decision to take tuitions. The study adapts convenience sampling with a sample size of 100 from various institutes of Delhi and NCR. The study indicates that those students who have taken tuitions in Class XII and have secured marks in the range of 70-80% along with 3 hours or more a week of tutoring and 50-60% marks up to 1 hour a week of tutoring have continued taking tuitions during their first year of management course.

 
 
 

Private supplementary tutoring has been an undiscussed topic for analysis, but in the recent past it is increasingly recognized to be of major importance (Bray, 2009; Lee et al., 2009; and Mori and Baker, 2010). From the parents’ point of view, this business consumes huge amount of household expenditure, while from the tutors’ point of view it is income generating. In the available literature, private supplementary tutoring is widely called shadow education (e.g., Bray, 1999; Buchmann, 2002; Lee et al., 2009; and Aslam and Atherton, 2012). This is so called because much of the content of private supplementary tutoring imitates that in the schools. As the content of the mainstream grows, so does the shadow education syllabus. In alignment with the existing literature (e.g., Bray, 1999; Silova et al., 2006; Lee et al., 2009; Silova, 2009; and Bregvadze, 2012), the definition of private supplementary tutoring adopted by this paper has three components: first, tutoring is provided in academic subjects not concerned with sports, music and artistic activities; second, it is provided in exchange for a fee; and third, it is provided in addition to regular schooling. Definition of shadow education varies. For example, according to Stevenson and Baker (1992), shadow education in Japan is the activity of those students who have left school and joined the institute called yobiko which provides support for retaking the examinations. Coniam (2013), in Hongkong, also provided a similar definition. The study uses the metaphor of the shadow because much of the private supplementary tutoring mimics the mainstream (Stevenson and Baker, 1992; Bray, 1999; and Lee et al., 2009).

 
 
 

Organizational Behavior Journal,Shadow Education (Private tutoring) , Scope to Predict Students Opting for Private Tuitions,Shadow Learning in Business Schools.