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The IUP Journal of English Studies :
An Emancipatory Space: Environment in Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and Sivakami’s The Taming of Women
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As we are grappling with the crisis of consumption of needs and conservation of nature in the current scenario, the indigenous Chippewa and Dalit communities have exhibited a humane attitude toward ecology. This paper looks at Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and Sivakami’s The Taming of Women as representation of the natural world in their communities and their struggle to continue living a natural way of life. Erdrich and Sivakami, like many naturalists and nature writers, hold that the only hope of environmental salvation is one based on a deep understanding of and commitment to the land. In her novel Tracks, Erdrich depicts the struggle that the Chippewa community undergoes as keepers of the land. Indeed, by recounting the experiences that have sustained them in spite of the natural exploitation by the whites, she insists on the eco-values imbibed by the community. Like the indigenous worldview, Sivakami’s writings explore the strong sense of physical and spiritual interconnectedness of all things on the earth, where all coexist and are equal to one another. Sivakami represents in her novels living in harmony with nature and emphasizes on the harmony and symbiosis between nature and humankind. She draws on the rituals that bind her characters with nature as people who live close to the land. The paper seeks to understand the relationship between women and land as a relationship of mutual survival and change.

 
 
 

Louise Erdrich and Sivakami, like many naturalists and nature writers, hold that the only hope of environmental salvation is the one based on deep respect and understanding of the entities. Tracks and The Plague of Doves by Erdrich and The Grip of Change and The Taming of Women by Sivakami deal with the strong sense of physical and spiritual interconnectedness of all things on the earth, where all are equal to one another. In these novels, Erdrich and Sivakami agree that the natives of America and the villagers in India still live in an inextricably bound way with nature where nature and culture are inseparable.

 
 

Journal of English Studies