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The IUP Journal of Supply Chain Management :
Design for Disassembly to Attain Sustainability: Analyzing the Past and Proposing Further Research Opportunities
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Design for Disassembly (DfD), a sustainable strategy, is being seen as a potential solution to address the deteriorating environmental condition and societal pressure for clean and healthy environment. The topic has generated immense interest among the researchers in the last few years. With this as a base, the present study conducts a structured literature review to highlight the past research status and develop a proposition for future. The study undertook a content analysis of 96 peer-reviewed articles related to DfD, sorted out from online Scopus database. The categories along which all the 96 articles classified are: year-wise, journal-wise, main author, region analysis, research methodology, mathematical/Operation Research (OR) technique, Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods, industry type, DfD practices/metrics, drivers and barriers. The findings of the classified analysis suggest that DfD is a fruitful area for future research. Also, the gap analysis of the existing research on DfD brings to light several opportunities for research such as more research that generates quantitative results, application of research field across different industries, analyzing the complex criteria using various MCDM techniques, etc. The classified analysis and the findings of the study present several opportunities to researchers to investigate the issues.

 
 
 

Global warming, usage of toxic and hazardous substance and the way the natural resources are being utilized in the past few years have increasingly raised concern amongst the community and organizations. Sustenance of the organizations under such pressure is a challenge and hence has initiated search for sustainable solutions. Several sustainable strategies are being adopted such as: End-of-Life (EOL) products recovery (Yi et al., 2016); process and product innovation (Radu and Francoeur, 2017); corporate social responsibility (Lopez-Perez et al., 2017). Design for Disassembly (DfD) is one such sustainable strategy that is being considered as a prominent solution to attain sustainability in recent times. The incorporation of strategies that specifically focus on the disassembly aspect results in improved environmental performance and provides a competitive advantage in the market (Sabaghi et al., 2015). Go et al. (2015) implemented DfD concept in the product to reduce the disassembly time. According to Cerdan et al. (2009), to reduce product dismantling cost and also to boost recycling and reusability of the product at the end-of-its life, DfD is most prominent. Tsai et al. (2003) suggest that DfD mainly focuses on the reduction of maintenance costs through optimizing the disassembly operations or permit reuse, recycling and remanufacturing of the used product, thus terming it as an EcoDesign methodology. Kumar and Putnam (2008) define DfD as “the initiative that leads to the correct identification of design specifications to minimize the complexity of the structure of the product for ease of breaking it down to constituent components or materials”. Hence, DfD is a concept that different authors look at from various perspectives and explain the terminology in different ways.

 
 
 

Supply Chain Management Journal