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The IUP Journal of International Relations :
PASOK:PASOK: The Peculiar Greek Social Democracy The Peculiar Greek Social Democracy
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The Greek social democrats have been on a recovery path since 2012 when the biggest crisis of their history began. After the successful formation in 1974, the Pan-Hellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK) experienced a spectacular rise and for four decades it decisively influenced the prevailing Greek politics. For a long time, PASOK had the broad support of the majority of socioeconomic groups and along with the conservative New Democracy (ND) defined Greece’s path to the democratization and Europeanization era. The multidimensional crisis which Greece had entered after the onset of the international economic crisis in 2007 had a drastic impact on the political landscape. In the dual parliamentary elections on May 6 and June 17, 2012, PASOK received 12-13% of the votes, only three years after it had received 44%. In 2015, PASOK received the worst electoral percentage in its history, namely, 4.6%. This decisive defeat was expected for a long time, but no one predicted its dramatic size. In any case, PASOK has clearly lost its earlier influence and entered a long period of resignation and disorientation. This study focuses on the specificities of PASOK in comparison with the social democratic parties of Western Europe.

 
 
 

Pan-Hellenic Socialist Movement (PASOK), a Greek version of social democracy, has followed a synchronized path and is characterized by a great deal of special features in contradiction with the social democratic parties of the advanced countries of the Western Europe. In this sense, PASOK expresses, on the one hand, the delayed emergence of social democracy in Greece. On the other hand, PASOK was the decisive political power which enhanced the gradual social normalization, social integration, convergence, democratization, Europeanization and modernization of the Greek society, and therefore it constitutes an endemic element of its modernity. PASOK’s advanced modernism, in other words, allows us to assume that not only will it survive and recover from the current crisis, but will return to new times of hegemony. However, some theorists conjecture that the PASOK era is over and that the once-proud party has plunged into insignificance while it is unable to find the right tools to recover and prevent its own extinction.

 
 
 

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