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The IUP Journal of Knowledge Management :
Knowledge Indicators for Implementation of Knowledge Creation: A Critical Examination Using Structural Equation Modeling
and a Proposed Framework
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This paper was developed keeping in view a holistic model which successfully integrates not only the knowledge indicators, but also the implementation of knowledge creation at workplace. Today, knowledge plays a vital role in an organization, where minimization of other resources has been accomplished. Traditional functioning has changed into knowledge functioning in sharing, documenting, acquiring, transferring and applying knowledge and fostering knowledge creation within the employees. The knowledge creation has helped the organizations to make themselves distinct from other organizations. The ability to create new knowledge is often at the heart of the organizations’ competitive advantage. Sometimes, this issue is not treated as a part of knowledge management since it borders and overlaps innovation management (Wellman, 2009). In this paper, four indicators of knowledge creation are reviewed and integrated. The paper looks at how the knowledge indicators can enhance knowledge creation in the employees. The results reveal that the four indicators of knowledge management have an impact of 70% on knowledge creation.

 
 
 

The term “knowledge” has become a buzzword in the present corporate world and is also dominating in the new era of “Knowledge Management (KM)”. Today, organizations, in order to confront the challenges in the competitive world, need to brace more capabilities by constantly upgrading their knowledge base. According to Nonaka and Takeuchi’s (1996) SECI model, knowledge creation is about continuous transfer, combination and conversion of different types of knowledge, as users practice, interact, and learn. Cook and Brown (1999) distinguish between knowledge and knowing, and suggest that knowledge creation is a product of the interplay between them. Subsequently, how to effectively create knowledge organization is widely debated and the technique is knowledge creation, which is extensively accepted in the field of management. Several researchers have studied the knowledge creation process (Nonaka et al., 2001; Byounggu and Heeseok, 2002; and Bathelt et al., 2004), but still there is no consensus evolved. Tiwana (2000) studies the creation of knowledge in a person, department and organization, and making them understand with an expanded level of usefulness mirrors the path of the dynamic procedure to capture creation.

 
 
 

Knowledge Management Journal