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The IUP Journal of Law Review :
Neurodiversity Management: A Step Towards Inclusivity
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More than one billion people in the world live with some form of disability, of whom nearly 200 million experience considerable difficulties in functioning. Disabled people are prevented from participating fully on equal terms in mainstream society. Following the entry into force of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), disability is increasingly understood as a human rights issue. The Right of Persons with Disabilities Act, 2016 has expanded the definition of Disability from 7 to 21 and included among others mental illness. The nomenclature mental retardation is replaced with intellectual disability under the Act. As defined at 2011 National Symposium on Neurodiversity, Neurodiversity is a concept where neurological differences are to be recognized and respected as any other human variation. The neurodiverse population remains a largely untapped talent pool. Modern-day employers have begun to understand these neurodiverse conditions, which represent the different ways in which a person learns, processes information and communicates. This paper attempts to push for an economic model with the focus on establishing a linkage between health-related limitation of mental illness and the kind of work that can be performed by them.

 
 
 

‘Disability’ refers to a handicap—mental or physical—that prevents a person from leading a life of normalcy. It can include in its ambit an impairment which may include a combination of mental and physical handicap. Disabilities,2 as examined by the World Health Organization, is a wide-ranging term. Most disturbingly, close to billion people worldwide suffer from one or the other disability. Of these, nearly 200 million people suffer wide-ranging difficulties in living.3 ‘Disability’ is a human condition. On account of this impairment, disabled people are not on same footing as others and remain non-participating members in the mainstream society. They are at an inherent disadvantage compared to others and thus face barriers in every walk of life, namely, healthcare, education and employment. They remain subject to isolation and thus are forced to lead a life of deprivation and pity.

 
 
 

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