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The IUP Journal of Law Review :
Right to Privacy and Techno-Legal Issues
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It is no secret that technology is becoming more integrated in our work lives, and since we are getting more comfortable with it, we are allowing technology to become more involved with our personal lives too. Human beings value their privacy and the protection of their personal sphere of life. They value some control over who knows what about them. They certainly do not want their personal information to be accessible to just anyone at any time. It is a fact that the scientific advancements and technological progressiveness have touched the pinnacle of the age. The explosion of information in the technological era is an outcome of technology and networked cyberspace spread across the four corners of the globe. Globalization of communication in this era brings many advantages to the mankind. At the same time, it also brings certain unforeseen and unpredictable maladies. Privacy is one such issue that bothers all the nations, netizens and the citizens alike. Hence, the present paper focuses on the legality of technological issues, while dealing with various statutory provisions with regard to privacy law.

 
 
 

Today, there are many perturbations happening, which violate the right to privacy in the cyber space, since ‘Cyber space’ simply refers to the ephemeral space occupied by computer transmissions and communications. The spread of cyber space around the world is interconnected and operated through millions of networked computers and electronic devices. The users use these networks for different purposes, leading to the generation of large data. The transactional data thus available can be recorded at remote servers and is available at different sites around the globe. This transactional data can be processed by predetermined software to classify and organize the data so as to give its value and can be used for intelligence purposes. This classified transitional data can reveal facts about the user’s interests, his friends or relatives or his personal preferences and the time at which he had talked or shared his information at what length and what period etc., and the whole range of such personal activities. In other words, users leave an electronic trace of their transactions without knowing by whom it is used. Generally, such data is a value-added commodity for information managers, strategists and terrorists alike.

 
 
 

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