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The IUP Journal of English Studies
ISSN: 0973-3728
A ‘peer reviewed’ journal indexed on Elsevier,
and also distributed by EBSCO and Proquest Database

June'18

Previous Issues

The IUP Journal of English Studies, an academic initiative of the IUP, is an intellectual vehicle for informed critical evaluations of various areas of literature, English Language Teaching, translation studies relating to emerging and established genres. A fresh and invigorating evaluation of the contributions of writers and their significant writings are on offer in the Journal.

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  • British Literature
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  • Commonwealth Literature
  • Indian Writing in English
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An Introduction to Selected Patterns of Lexical Coinages in James Joyce’s Novels
Trinity as Archetype: Joyce, Stephen, and Bloom
Novel as Counter-Narrative of the Nation: Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things
Man and Nature: An Ecocritical Analysis of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart
An Emancipatory Space: Environment in Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and Sivakami’s The Taming of Women
An Eternity of Lines Around My Throat: Negotiating Old Age in the Poems of Contemporary Indian Women Poets in English
Linguistic-Literary Camouflage in Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl”
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Contents
(June 2018)

An Introduction to Selected Patterns of Lexical Coinages in James Joyce’s Novels

--Sukanya Saha

The verbal imitations of mental processes are successfully attempted by James Joyce in his three novels, namely, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake. Joyce’s experiment with English language structures and vocabulary to capture the ceaseless flow of thought process is strikingly noticeable. His use of the literary technique “stream of consciousness” delineates the flow of expressions, associations, hesitations, impulses, and rational thoughts of his characters. Joyce’s verbatim reproductions of the workings of the mind have caught the reader’s attention owing to his startling experiments with the traditionally accepted norms of word formation. Joyce coins innumerable lexical items through strange combinations of letters, compounding, suffixation, conversions, and many such devices. This paper attempts to highlight some of the structures of his coinages as it might interest those readers who intend to understand the logic behind such word formation strategies.

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Trinity as Archetype: Joyce, Stephen, and Bloom

--Venkatesan Iyengar

The paper interprets two of the major works of James Joyce in the light of the existing autobiographical and biographical information on Joyce the man and the artist by expounding the expressive theory of art that the work of an author is the expression of his life, a theory Joyce attributes to Shakespeare in his novel Ulysses. It is by now an acknowledged fact that Joyce’s oeuvre is rooted in his life and times, and parallels and analogies have widely been drawn to drive this message home. Premising that Joyce’s life and work make one, the paper explores and elucidates the archetypal leitmotif of the blessed Trinity—God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—that predominates Joyce’s works A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses.

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Novel as Counter-Narrative of the Nation: Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things

--Rajeshwar Mittapalli

In her novel The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy offers a deeply critical perspective on modern India while riveting the reader’s attention on the microcosm that constitutes the story. She unobtrusively works her commentary on issues confronting the nation into the narrative, which readily invites the discerning reader’s honest reflection on them. This paper discusses The God of Small Things in terms of its engagement with three major issues—degradation of environment, commodification of culture, and degeneration of Indian democracy—and demonstrates how in the process the novel challenges the prevailing paradigms and dominant narratives of the nation that are based on a romantic concept of the nation, inadequate understanding of ground realities, and lopsided priorities. The paper then focuses on how the novel suggests alternative scenarios foregrounding the experiences of the voiceless, the underprivileged, and the disenfranchised. It further establishes how Roy’s commentary underlying The God of Small Things deeply impacts imagination and how in the final analysis the novel emerges as an authentic counter-narrative of the nation.

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Man and Nature: An Ecocritical Analysis of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

--J Frederick Allen

This paper examines the need for an ecocritical method of analyzing literary texts. It explores various studies on the subject and identifies a method of analysis based on a system of classification propounded by Nirmal Selvamony. He defines three types of oikos: the integrative, the hierarchic, and the anarchic, each with distinct characteristics. The paper seeks to explain how this classification can be taken up as a tool for analysis of literary texts. The paper also analyzes, using Selvamony’s classification, Chinua Achebe’s path-breaking novel Things Fall Apart and explains how Christian colonization irrevocably changed the integrative oikos of Umuofia into the anarchic oikos.

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An Emancipatory Space: Environment in Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and Sivakami’s The Taming of Women

--C L Shilaja

As we are grappling with the crisis of consumption of needs and conservation of nature in the current scenario, the indigenous Chippewa and Dalit communities have exhibited a humane attitude toward ecology. This paper looks at Louise Erdrich’s Tracks and Sivakami’s The Taming of Women as representation of the natural world in their communities and their struggle to continue living a natural way of life. Erdrich and Sivakami, like many naturalists and nature writers, hold that the only hope of environmental salvation is one based on a deep understanding of and commitment to the land. In her novel Tracks, Erdrich depicts the struggle that the Chippewa community undergoes as keepers of the land. Indeed, by recounting the experiences that have sustained them in spite of the natural exploitation by the whites, she insists on the eco-values imbibed by the community. Like the indigenous worldview, Sivakami’s writings explore the strong sense of physical and spiritual interconnectedness of all things on the earth, where all coexist and are equal to one another. Sivakami represents in her novels living in harmony with nature and emphasizes on the harmony and symbiosis between nature and humankind. She draws on the rituals that bind her characters with nature as people who live close to the land. The paper seeks to understand the relationship between women and land as a relationship of mutual survival and change.

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An Eternity of Lines Around My Throat: Negotiating Old Age in the Poems of Contemporary Indian Women Poets in English

--Kalyani Mookherji

Relationships are a recurring theme in the poetry of women poets. Being a daughter, wife, lover, and/or mother is examined and reexamined, often with reference to the men in their lives. The complexity of these roles and the network of family, lovers, and friends offer rich material for poetic content. And one of the most interesting figures to emerge out of these interconnections is the woman in her twilight years. This paper draws on the theories of feminism, gerontology, and cultural historicism to analyze how Indian women poets explore the many expectations, concerns, and privileges that come with old age, especially as they relate to women in India. With this aim, the paper focuses on the poems of Melanie Silgardo, Eunice De Souza, Kamala Das, Smita Agarwal, and Tara Patel from the anthology Nine Indian Women Poets edited by Eunice de Souza. The paper attempts to show how old age is both a time of difficulties and possibilities. Though many of the unique issues affecting elderly women in India are a product of long-entrenched unequal patriarchal structures, it is still possible for individuals—as evident from the voices in the poems—to carve out spaces of personal responses.

Article Price : Rs.50

Linguistic-Literary Camouflage in Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl”

--K Jayasree

Oral tradition has been a very effective tool in the propagation of patriarchal ideology. Jamaica Kincaid turns this on its head when she shows in her “Girl” that the very same method can be used to instill ideas of subversion in girls who have traditionally been taught only subservience. The writer herself does this with her writing style as the narrative does not fit into any clear definitions. It is a text marked by deviations of style, language, and ideas. It shows how a woman staying in the private sphere that has been allocated to her by a misogynist society can still learn to fulfill her aspirations. What is important in this text is that the author does not call for outright rebellion but enunciates ways in which the hegemony of society can be thwarted while still living within its ambit, covertly. While doing so Kincaid seems to suggest that it is imperative that the same be taught to coming generations of women. A structural analysis of the text shows that the seemingly disjointed sentences and phrases are actually a well-thought-out narrative working as a call to arms.

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Automated Teller Machines (ATMs): The Changing Face of Banking in India

Bank Management
Information and communication technology has changed the way in which banks provide services to its customers. These days the customers are able to perform their routine banking transactions without even entering the bank premises. ATM is one such development in recent years, which provides remote banking services all over the world, including India. This paper analyzes the development of this self-service banking in India based on the secondary data.

The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is playing a very important role in the progress and advancement in almost all walks of life. The deregulated environment has provided an opportunity to restructure the means and methods of delivery of services in many areas, including the banking sector. The ICT has been a focused issue in the past two decades in Indian banking. In fact, ICTs are enabling the banks to change the way in which they are functioning. Improved customer service has become very important for the very survival and growth of banking sector in the reforms era. The technological advancements, deregulations, and intense competition due to the entry of private sector and foreign banks have altered the face of banking from one of mere intermediation to one of provider of quick, efficient and customer-friendly services. With the introduction and adoption of ICT in the banking sector, the customers are fast moving away from the traditional branch banking system to the convenient and comfort of virtual banking. The most important virtual banking services are phone banking, mobile banking, Internet banking and ATM banking. These electronic channels have enhanced the delivery of banking services accurately and efficiently to the customers. The ATMs are an important part of a bank’s alternative channel to reach the customers, to showcase products and services and to create brand awareness. This is reflected in the increase in the number of ATMs all over the world. ATM is one of the most widely used remote banking services all over the world, including India. This paper analyzes the growth of ATMs of different bank groups in India.
International Scenario

If ATMs are largely available over geographically dispersed areas, the benefit from using an ATM will increase as customers will be able to access their bank accounts from any geographic location. This would imply that the value of an ATM network increases with the number of available ATM locations, and the value of a bank network to a customer will be determined in part by the final network size of the banking system. The statistical information on the growth of branches and ATM network in select countries.

Indian Scenario

The financial services industry in India has witnessed a phenomenal growth, diversification and specialization since the initiation of financial sector reforms in 1991. Greater customer orientation is the only way to retain customer loyalty and withstand competition in the liberalized world. In a market-driven strategy of development, customer preference is of paramount importance in any economy. Gone are the days when customers used to come to the doorsteps of banks. Now the banks are required to chase the customers; only those banks which are customercentric and extremely focused on the needs of their clients can succeed in their business today.

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