Apr'19


The IUP Journal of Structural Engineering

ISSN: 0974-6528

A 'peer reviewed' journal distributed by EBSCO and Proquest Database

Structural engineering is usually considered as a specialty discipline within civil engineering, but can also be studied in its own right. It is the science and art of designing and making buildings, bridges, frameworks and other similar structures. It has taken a completely different path since the middle of the 20th century. It involves understanding the load-resisting properties of components such as beams, columns, walls, slabs, plates, arches, shells, catenaries, etc., and selecting, proportioning, and connecting different components of a structure to resist the forces and displacements without affecting the safety of the structure. Structural Engineers are responsible for using funds, structural elements and materials creatively and efficiently. In recognition of the growing importance of this branch of engineering, IUP has come up with a quarterly journal, The IUP Journal of Structural Engineering.

Privileged access to Online edition for Subscribers.

Focus Areas
  • Reinforced Concrete Structures
  • Steel Structures
  • Cable Structures
  • Nonlinear Structures
  • Nuclear   Containment Structures
  • Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering
  • Structural Analysis and Mechanics
  • Structural Condition/Health Monitoring of Bridge Structures
  • Analysis and Control of Vibrations
  • Properties and Strength of Materials
  • Construction Engineering
CheckOut
Article   Price (₹) Buy
The Effect of Size of Piles on the Seismic Response of Multi-Storey Buildings Considering Soil-Structure Interaction
50
A Comparative Study of Fly Ash Concrete
50
A Study on the Mechanical Properties of Ceramic Waste Aggregate Concrete
50
Strength and Durability Properties of Bacterial Concrete with Partial Replacement of GGBS: An Experimental Investigation
50
The Effect of Aspect Ratio of Steel Fibers on the Tensile Behavior of Standard Concrete (M30)
50
     
Contents : (Apr 2019)

The Effect of Size of Piles on the Seismic Response of Multi-Storey Buildings Considering Soil-Structure Interaction
Prema A Shet, C M Ravi Kumar and H Eramma

Foundation is the fundamental component of the structure which associates with the earth and exchanges the load from structure to the ground. Foundations are normally thought to be either shallow or deep. Pile foundation is a major type of deep foundation. The Soil-Pile Structure Interaction (SPSI) is a complex phenomenon, which can affect the response of structure during dynamic excitation such as earthquake. To deal with such complexities, it is necessary to consider soil properties and foundation properties for analyzing system behavior under dynamic excitation. The present investigation intends to study the effects of the SPSI on the dynamic response of buildings with a 15-storey moment resisting frame resting on differently sized floating pile foundation simulated numerically. The present study describes a numerical modeling technique using SAP 2000 software for the simulation of complex seismic SPSI phenomenon. By adopting direct method of calculation, numerical model can perform a linear response spectrum method and linear static analysis to realistically simulate the dynamic behavior of soil, pile foundations and structure under seismic excitations. The results obtained for storey displacement, storey drift, pile bending moments, pile shear force and lateral pile deflection show that the type of pile elements influences the dynamic characteristics and seismic response of building due to interaction of soil, pile foundations and structure.


© 2018 IUP. All Rights Reserved.

Article Price : ? 50

A Comparative Study of Fly Ash Concrete
J Saravanan, G Srinivasan and Anandarakrishnan

The paper presents a comparative study on two types of fly ash concretes. Fly ash replacement by various percentages of 20%, 30% and 40% was made. The conventional M25 grade of concrete was made using OPC 53 grade. The optimize mix ratio and mechanical and durability properties of fly ash-based concrete are evaluated and compared with test results.


© 2018 IUP. All Rights Reserved.

Article Price : ? 50

A Study on the Mechanical Properties of Ceramic Waste Aggregate Concrete
D Gopinath

It has been assessed that approximately 30% of the daily production is discarded as waste in a ceramic industry. There has been an unrestricted use of natural resources in concrete making, resulting in their depletion to an alarming rate. Hence, for the sustainable development of concrete technology and for safe environment, the use of industrial waste as an alternative for the conventional ingredients of concrete provides the best possible option. Bottom ash is a byproduct of the combustion of pulverized coal in power plants. Therefore, bottom ash can be used as a fine aggregate in concrete making to reduce huge consumption of natural resource. Silica fume is a waste byproduct in the manufacture of silicon from high purity quartz and coal in a submerged-arc electric furnace. It is a highly reactive pozzolanic material. According to IS: 456 (2000), silica fume was added to concrete mix 10% by weight of cement to enhance the impermeability of concrete. This paper makes an attempt to find out the suitability and adequacy of the ceramic waste as a possible substitute for conventional crushed stone coarse aggregate and bottom ash as a partial replacement for conventional fine aggregate in the concrete.


© 2018 IUP. All Rights Reserved.

Article Price : ? 50

Strength and Durability Properties of Bacterial Concrete with Partial Replacement of GGBS: An Experimental Investigation
Vijay Vardai, Tejas Doshi and M B Patil

The paper investigates the influence of bacteria on the strength and durability properties of normal and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) concrete. Cement was replaced with 40% of GGBS by weight. Different cell concentrations of bacteria were used in making the concrete mixes. Tests were performed for compressive, split tensile, Rapid Chloride Penetration Test (RCPT) and sulphate attack (Suthar and Parikh, 2016). Compressive strength and split tensile strength of GGBS bacterial concrete were higher with reduction in chloride penetration and increase in strength after sulphate attack was observed with a concentration 105 cells/mL of bacteria (Sudarshan and Tejas, 2016). Pseudomonas putida improves the strength and durability of concrete through self-healing effect.


© 2018 IUP. All Rights Reserved.

Article Price : ? 50

The Effect of Aspect Ratio of Steel Fibers on the Tensile Behavior of Standard Concrete (M30)
V Kesava Raju and K Srinivasa Rao

The paper makes an experimental investigation on standard concrete of M30 grade with the addition of steel fibers having different aspect ratios. The fibers were hookend type with aspect ratios of 40, 50 and 60. The percentages of steel fibers by weight of cement were 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%. M30 grade of concrete was designed using IS: 10262 (2009) having mixed proportions of 1:1.82:3.35:0.45. The test specimens were cured for 1, 3, 7 and 28 days. The cylinders were tested on 200 t compression testing machine and the beams were tested on 100 t universal testing machine. The results showed that the split tensile strength and flexural strength of standard concrete M30 by addition of steel fibers with an aspect ratio of 50 gave better results compared to 40 and 60 aspect ratios.


© 2018 IUP. All Rights Reserved.

Article Price : ? 50

Upload Articles
Click here to upload your Articles

Journals


Magazines


Articles of the Month
ISBN: 978-81-314-2793-4
Price: ₹250
Payment by D.D. favouring
"ICFAI A/c IUP", Hyderabad

Reach us at
info@iupindia.in
Tel: +91 8498843633